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Baledwyr

Ongoing Saga: China-Hong Kong Strife

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I don't know if its western journalism, but if China were viewed as a good actor it would be referred to as the "Chinese military". Same as the Iranian Revolutionary guard instead of the "Iranian Military". Assadist forces as opposed to "Syrian military" 

 

Is it just me or is this just the normal way to refer to the Chinese military? 

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It's the name of the Chinese army, People's Liberation Army. I don't think it's a subconscious decision on the part of mainstream media outlets to refer to these entities by other names as a way of dehumanising them. I could be wrong though. 

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7 hours ago, Abdel said:

I don't know if its western journalism, but if China were viewed as a good actor it would be referred to as the "Chinese military". Same as the Iranian Revolutionary guard instead of the "Iranian Military". Assadist forces as opposed to "Syrian military" 

 

Is it just me or is this just the normal way to refer to the Chinese military? 

 

The Revolutionary Guard in Iran is a separate structure from the actual military.

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Goes without saying really...it has escalated yet again. I would say I feel for the Hong Kong Police, but I know that the officers of the old Royal Hong Kong Police would have handled this situation better had they not all been removed from their positions within a matter of days after the handover in 1997. These police are all Beijing sympathisers. 

They arrested Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow yesterday...

 

 

 

 

 

What a crock of guch burocrazy crock of shit. 

 

Well shit. Didn't see that coming. @Feanor @Abdel

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HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong protesters chanting anti-government slogans trapped city leader Carrie Lam in a stadium for hours on Thursday after she held her first “open dialogue” with the people in a bid to end more than three months of often violent unrest.

 

 

Activists blocked roads and stood their ground despite police warnings, before beginning to disperse. More than four hours after the talks had ended, a convoy carrying Lam and other senior officials left the building under police guard.

Inside the British colonial-era Queen Elizabeth Stadium, residents had earlier chastised Lam, accusing her of ignoring the public and exacerbating a crisis that has no end in sight.

 

 

She had begun by saying her administration bore the heaviest responsibility for resolving the crisis.

“The whole storm was caused by the extradition bill initiated by the government,” Lam said. “If we want to walk away from the difficulty and find a way out, the government has to take the biggest responsibility to do so.”

Protests over the now-shelved extradition bill that would have allowed criminal suspects to be sent to mainland China for trial have evolved into broader calls for full democracy, in a stark challenge to China’s Communist Party leaders.

The demonstrations resumed after the dialogue session was over, with activists blocking roads around the stadium with iron railings and other debris.

The unrest followed an event that had been notable for not being the whitewash many predicted, with Lam directly facing off with an often critical and hostile audience, still aggrieved at the havoc they blame on the Beijing-backed leader and her team.

Protesters are angry about what they see as creeping Chinese interference in Hong Kong, which returned to China in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” formula intended to guarantee freedoms that are not enjoyed on the mainland.

Outside, large crowds of black-clad protesters chanted: “Hong Kong people, add oil,” a slogan meaning “keep your strength up”, while encircling the sports stadium and blocking exits.

 

Police warned that they would use force but did not intervene.

The event saw Lam holding talks with 150 members of the community.

Speakers criticizing her for curbing electoral freedoms, ignoring public opinion and refusing to allow an independent inquiry into allegations of police brutality. Several called on Lam to resign, saying she was no longer fit to lead.

 

“CALM DOWN”

 

Lam listened, taking notes, before responding on occasion. She appealed for people to give her government a chance, while emphasizing Hong Kong still had a bright future and a strong rule of law.

“I hope you all understand that we still care about Hong Kong society. Our heart still exists,” she said. “We will maintain our care for this society.”

She stressed again, however, that she saw no need at the moment for an independent inquiry, with an existing police complaint mechanism sufficient to meet public concerns.

She also reiterated there was no way she could bow to the demand for charges against those arrested for rioting to be dropped.

 

 

“I am not shirking responsibility, but Hong Kong really needs to calm down,” she said. “We have to stop sudden violence breaking out... Violation of the law will result in consequences we have to bear.”

She also conceded limits to what she could do.

“There are some things that me and my colleagues cannot influence in society ... but the dialogue will continue.”

China says it is committed to the “one country, two systems” arrangement and denies meddling. It has accused foreign governments, including the United States and Britain, of inciting the unrest.

 

CITY ON EDGE

 

City rail services resumed on Thursday after being halted on Wednesday night at Sha Tin station, where protesters vandalized fittings for the second time this week.

Rail operator MTR has at times suspended city rail services during the protests, preventing some demonstrators from gathering and thus making it a target of attack, with protesters vandalizing stations and setting fires near some exits.

When violence has flared, police have responded with tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets.

Hong Kong is on edge ahead of the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China on Oct. 1, with authorities eager to avoid scenes that could embarrass the central government in Beijing. Activists have planned a whole host of protests on the day.

The Asian financial hub also marks the fifth anniversary this weekend of the start of the “Umbrella” protests, a series of pro-democracy demonstrations in 2014 that failed to wrest concessions from Beijing.

 

Reporting by Felix Tam, James Pomfret, Anne Marie Roantree, Angie Teo, Poppy McPherson and Donny Kwok; Writing by Nick Macfie; Editing by Peter Graff and Alex Richardson

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-hongkong-protests/hong-kong-protesters-trap-leader-for-hours-in-stadium-after-open-dialogue-idUSKBN1WB06V?il=0

 

Personal Comment:

 

"Calm Down" ...lol...you need to flip a few pages ahead in the book since you started trying to reason out a little late, deary. 

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I mean... what else is there to say? Full-on democracy isn't likely to happen, this is China after all. 

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If they could get a little help...imagine a fully independent enclave so close to the PRC in line with NATO and the CoN again. 

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10 hours ago, Baledwyr said:

If they could get a little help...imagine a fully independent enclave so close to the PRC in line with NATO and the CoN again. 

 

Smells like a war. The ugly kind, since China will take it as neo-colonialism, and the island is so close to China that it's effectively indefensible. China could flatten the city with artillery and rockets.

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Good hustle, Steak.  

So this happened a few days ago.

 

 

  • Funny 1

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