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Tesla Model 3 Falls Short of a CR Recommendation

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Tesla Model 3 Falls Short of a CR Recommendation

 

Despite record range and agile handling, issues with braking, controls, and ride quality hurt the Model 3’s Overall Score

 

Tesla’s Model 3 represents the electric automaker’s first attempt at a more affordable mass-market car. In Consumer Reports’ tests, we found plenty to like about the luxury compact sedan (which starts at $35,000 but goes all the way up to $78,000), including record-setting range as well as exhilarating acceleration and handling that could make it a healthy competitor to performance-oriented cars such as BMW’s 3 Series and the Audi A4. Our testers also found flaws—big flaws—such as long stopping distances in our emergency braking test and difficult-to-use controls.

 

These problems keep the Model 3 from earning a Consumer Reports recommendation.

 

The Tesla’s stopping distance of 152 feet from 60 mph was far worse than any contemporary car we’ve tested and about 7 feet longer than the stopping distance of a Ford F-150 full-sized pickup.

 

A Tesla spokesperson told CR that the company’s own testing found stopping distances from 60 to 0 mph were an average of 133 feet, with the same tires as our Model 3. The automaker noted that stopping-distance results are affected by variables such as road surface, weather conditions, tire temperature, brake conditioning, outside temperature, and past driving behavior that may have affected the brake system.

 

In a series of tweets on Monday night, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that the braking issue CR identified could be fixed with a firmware update, which will be rolled out "in a few days." Musk went on to say that with further refinement "we can improve braking distance beyond initial specs." CR has reached out to Tesla for confirmation and will update this story as we receive more details.

 

 

As its name implies, CR’s braking test is meant to determine how a vehicle performs in an emergency situation. The test is based on an industry-standard procedure designed by SAE International, a global engineering association. Our testers get a car up to 60 mph, then slam on the brakes until the car comes to a stop. They repeat this multiple times to ensure consistent results. Between each test, the vehicle is driven approximately a mile to cool the brakes and make sure they don’t overheat.

 

The test is done at our 327-acre test facility on dedicated braking surfaces that are monitored for consistent surface friction. “Before each test, we make sure the brake pads and tires have been properly conditioned,” says Jake Fisher, director of auto testing at CR. “We’ve conducted it on more than 500 vehicles, and we are always looking for consistent, repeatable results.”

 

In our testing of the Model 3, the first stop we recorded was significantly shorter (around 130 feet, similar to Tesla’s findings), but that distance was not repeated, even after we let the brakes cool overnight. Consumer Reports publishes a distance based on all the stops we record in our test, not just the shortest individual stop.

 

Because we saw some inconsistency in the braking performance, we got a second Model 3 (a privately owned vehicle that was loaned to CR) to verify our results. CR has tested second samples in previous situations to double-check our findings.

 

When we ran the second Model 3 through the same tests, we got almost identical results.

 

In our tests of both Model 3 samples, the stopping distances were much longer than the stopping distances we recorded on other Teslas and other cars in this class.

 

The Tesla Model 3’s 152 feet is 21 feet longer than the class average of 131 feet for luxury compact sedans and 25 feet longer than the results for its much larger SUV sibling, the Model X.

 

CR’s experience with the Model 3’s braking is not unique. Car and Driver, in its published test of a Model 3, said it noticed “a bizarre amount of variation” in its test, including one stop from 70 mph that took “an interminable 196 feet.”

 

“I’ve been testing cars for 11 years,” Car and Driver Testing Director K.C. Colwell said in an interview with CR, “and in 11 years, no car has stood out with inconsistent braking like this. Some trucks have. . . . It was just weird.”

 

The Tesla spokeswoman says the company has the ability to update its vehicles over the air. “Unlike other vehicles, Tesla is uniquely positioned to address more corner cases over time through over-the-air software updates, and it continually does so to improve factors such as stopping distance,” she says.

 

https://www.consumerreports.org/hybrids-evs/tesla-model-3-review-falls-short-of-consumer-reports-recommendation/

 

Personal Commet: This comes as Tesla continues to lose money, and production falls under expectations.

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I doubt a driver update is gonna help reduce breaking diatance significantlly if the problem is mechanical in nature in the braking system

Trough i will note that the more electronics a car has the weirder it starts doing stuff when something in electronics breaks

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The days when you could sill learn to be a mechanic via a grease manual, a few cold beers and an afternoon of trial and error. Long Gone Are They Now.

Edited by Guest

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The days when you could sill learn to be a mechanic via a grease manual, a few cold beers and an afternoon of trial and error. Long Gone Are They Now.

 

I mean... it still works that way in Mongolia.

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Whose talking about Mongolia though?

 

I mean, this is one more career that used to be accessible to everyone if you had the inclination and time to put into it. You didn't need to go to uni and incur huge debts. But now it seems the mechanics of the future will have to be it professionals as well.

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Don t know about that boyz

Lithuanians fix any car without any uni degree

Right in front of my warehouse there are local balto slavic gopnik boyz who i seen fix cars from tesla to porche to any car you can imagine they have all the equipment needed trough cause they apparentlly fix foreign cars mostly as their service is too expensive for local lithuanians

The plate numbers also i seen from US to different EU countries to RU plates

They do a good job but after talking to some of them i can gurantee you half of them don t have uni degree and other half have some shit degree like law or some other degree that has nothing to do with mechanics

 

 

Google nowadays helps even idiots do a uni degree guys job

 

Overall i think universities nowadays are a waste of time to learn something everyone goes to them only to have fun or find likeminded people thats it

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Whose talking about Mongolia though?

 

I mean, this is one more career that used to be accessible to everyone if you had the inclination and time to put into it. You didn't need to go to uni and incur huge debts. But now it seems the mechanics of the future will have to be it professionals as well.

It's a good thing though.

Edited by Guest

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I mean... it still works that way in Mongolia.

 

Not to be demeaning to the Mongolians but they named one of their cities after a horse that run in a race.

 

I did discover that they own 6x as many cars as Haitans (per 1,000 people). At least according to Wikipedia. So that's interesting.

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Not to be demeaning to the Mongolians but they named one of their cities after a horse that run in a race.

 

I did discover that they own 6x as many cars as Haitans (per 1,000 people). At least according to Wikipedia. So that's interesting.

You find the notion that a people whose culture has been heavily centred around horses and steppe life for - millennia - naming a city after a famous horse to be odd in any way? O.o

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Not to be demeaning to the Mongolians but they named one of their cities after a horse that run in a race.

 

I did discover that they own 6x as many cars as Haitans (per 1,000 people). At least according to Wikipedia. So that's interesting.

 

A car is a steel horse.

Edited by Guest

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