Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Draupne

Slav coffee habits

Recommended Posts

Update: There has been another sudden increase of disgusting loh jibanis at the gas station. Among them now are Spanish industrial personnel recruited to our local factory district. They barely speak english and they screw up the fuel pumps every damn time. The lithuanians bring their hood girls with them and consume every drop of milk in the coffee machines whenever they arrive. One of them has the appearance of the most generic human being you can possibly imagine

At this point out of all the immigrants around here it's actually the somalians who behave best. They didnt do jack shit here as far as I know. That is a pleasant surprise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i had to read twice before i understood that you are talking about lohi jabani

loh is like the worst insult you can receive in either slavic or baltic countries

 

jesus simply don t put the milk in and tell them no milk is available

after a few times they will either stop asking for it or stop coming to your place for milk

 

to be frank i don t actually know why balts and slavs like so much milk in their coffee because i don t drink coffee never got into the habit of it

maybe your coffee machine just makes a terrible taste coffee and thats why they put so much milk in

 

just drink green tea and thats it

 

altrough i heard people in my country like to put sugar into teas

which is heresy if you ask me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black coffee all the way, there are only two kinds I have tasted that didn't work. One with berry taste, expensive and tasted really bad with a bittersweet aftertaste. And Zoegas coffee, yuck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i had to read twice before i understood that you are talking about lohi jabani

loh is like the worst insult you can receive in either slavic or baltic countries

 

Лох is only an East Slavic word--not a word in Polish, but definitely Russian, and I've heard Ukrainians use it before too (Belorussian probably has it too). No idea about the Baltic languages. But speaking for Russian, idk why you think it's the worst insult you can receive. It's just a rude/insulting way to call someone a "sucker" or a "schmuck". It'll piss someone off, but that's only because you're calling them out as a bitch, and yeah most Slavs tend to take that kind of challenge pretty seriously. But it's far from the worst possible insult you could receive in a Slavic language, since as you no doubt know, you can get really creative and really insulting in Slavic languages with all the prefixes and suffixes and shit.

 

Don't tell me you haven't heard more creative and offensive insults than лох, cause even when I'm just joking around with my other Russian or Polish friends/cousins we've called each other worse things than that just for shits and giggles. Maybe if you're really insecure about people thinking you're an easy mark, лох might be the most offensive thing someone could call you. But honestly even talking about single-word insults, calling someone a Петух (Petuh) is way more insulting than calling them a Лох. For you non-Ruskis, it literally means "cock" ie rooster, but as an insult it references the prison slang which refers to the lowest of the low in prison: the "faggots"--or more accurately the "bitches"--guys who get raped and generally just abused for fun, treated like women or even just a dehumanized hole. Even calling someone a петух as a joke is liable to get you hit. Лох, not so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Лох is only an East Slavic word--not a word in Polish, but definitely Russian, and I've heard Ukrainians use it before too (Belorussian probably has it too). No idea about the Baltic languages..

 

Is Лох not just "Salmon"? In Yiddish לאַקס (laks) just means Salmon and has been borrowed into American English as "Lox".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is Лох not just "Salmon"? In Yiddish לאַקס (laks) just means Salmon and has been borrowed into American English as "Lox".

 

Russian/Cyrillic grammar lesson:

 

The "X" in Cyrillic is equivalent to the English alphabet "H". So "Лох" is pronounced "loh", with a hard h (like how you pronounce the h in "hard"). There is no single letter in Cyrillic to denote the English "X", so instead you would write out "кс" (the "s" in cyrillic is just "c").

 

Good ol' New York Jewish "Lox" spelled in Cyrillic would be "лoкс", or more likely "лакс". This is obviously not a word in Russian, but if you were to spell it in Cyrillic then that's how it would work. The Russian word for salmon is "лосось", pronounced lah-soh-s'. When typing Russian in the English alphabet, the soft-sign "ь" is portrayed with a ' however it takes too much effort to explain how it actually affect the pronunciation of the preceding letter without actually giving you a verbal example. You can probably find a youtube video or something about it if you care enough. But to put it overly simply, it tends to make the preceding letter "sharper". Regardless, лосось and Lox are clearly somewhat similar, but obviously deviated from one another off of their common root enough that they are still distinct. Lox and Лох however, are two completely different words, written in different alphabets.

 

Spelling equivalents:

ENG = RUS

Lox = Лакс (not a real word, just like Loh isn't a word in English)

Loh = Лох

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its not just loh

its loh jibanai that triggers people hard

 

you are guaranteed to get into a fight if you say this phrase randomly e ti cio loh jibanai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...