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Hannibal

Internet and TV Providers in other countries

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For about the last week I have been on a epic battle with our TV/ISP to fix or replace our internet (we have[had hopefully] random disconnects on the router) and the price was outrageous. It's very long very painful story which truthfully isn't over yet (almost!) but I was talking with some other people from other countries and was more or less curious about ISP's and TV providers abroad.

 

So for example I live in America, not to far from Chicago. Our two 'main' ISP/TV providers are Comcast...found this good artice: http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/19/6004131/comcast-the-worst-company-in-america

 

There is a very interesting segment in it that if you don't read anything else this should explain how it got started.

THE RISE OF AMERICAN CABLE MONOPOLIES

 

When the first cable entrepreneurs were wiring cities, local governments typically granted a single franchise for each community, or divided the territory among a few companies. In Philadelphia in the late ’80s, for example, neighborhoods were divided up among four cable providers (Comcast had the Northeast).

 

Because of infrastructure costs, and because some cities didn’t want to grant multiple franchises, each company stayed on its own turf. They competed for franchises, but once granted, the companies started looking for a new community that hadn’t been wired yet. Once every community was wired, cable companies still didn’t compete — instead, they opted to consolidate. As a result, most American cities are now served by only one cable company.

 

Competition is further discouraged by a patchwork of local regulations that require permits and access to public rights of way. (Google declined to build out its fiber network in California, for example, because of complex environmental regulations.)

 

Around the world, things are different. Unbundling policies, which required incumbents to lease their networks to competitors at fair prices, spurred competition in France, Japan, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the Netherlands.

 

Unbundling isn’t a "magic bullet," says the Open Technology Institute, which issued areport on telecom policies around the world. In the UK, the unbundling policy was ineffective until the government forced BT, the dominant cable provider, to create a separate unit dedicated to selling network access to BT and its competitors.

 

But when combined with other measures such as price transparency, "dig once" policies that encourage planning for future infrastructure, and city-owned networks that can be leased to private companies, unbundling leads to lower prices and faster speeds.

 

 

and AT&T. https://www.att.com/internet/

 

Both of these companies require you to get a 'bundle' where they wrap in home phone, cable, and internet. They pull you in with a decent 1 year price (usually around $90 USD) then jump up to over $200. You have to call and complain and can get it down a little but will never get the new customer price again. Ultimately what I ended up doing when trying to switch from Comcast to AT&T was find a TV provider through the internet (I found Sling tv) and ditch the phone can cable. Now we just pay $80 a month for 75mbs and our 'TV' is now streamed through a Chromecast. We are actually staying with comcast because they have the best price per mbs at the moment.

 

Again I was mostly curious how these companies work in other countries, I guess some questions I have are:

Are the TV (we call it cable here) providers and internet providers the same company where you are?

How does their pricing work? Do they require you to 'bundle' to get a temporary 'deal' then jack up the price when the 'deal' expires?

How much do you pay for what speed?

And I guess what is the level or quality of their customer service (I'm sure all gamers must have had to deal with this on numerous occasions)?

Also how does home infrastructure work? Do you have boxes on all of the tv's (we call them cable boxes) and I'm assuming everyone has a wireless router?

 

And on a final note this South Park clip pretty much sums up the consumers view of cable/internet providers in America. :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0sAVtOt2wA

So, how bad is it by you?!

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Ï like denmark even more now ^^ seem like we dont have deals that change or only last for one 1 like you so i just keep living in this place then :D

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They bundle again. It makes absolutely no sense for companies to unbundle these services so you get companies that try to bundle all of it: TV, Internet, telephone, mobile phone, and even electricity in some cases (this is a big thing in France).

 

More services, means more customer loyalty and from the perspective of the customer you get more discount when you combine everything.

 

Network based it's still pretty one sided: KPN owns the entire phone and coax network and whilst other providers are allowed to use it, it is often best to join KPN or one of its smaller sister companies. Optical fibre sees more competition, but the smaller companies that started it are slowly being eaten by the big companies.

 

As for pricing: none of the companies do these tricks you mentioned. If they would up their prices so dramatically the next year then customers would just switch to another provider. Most providers no longer stunt with their starter prices, but instead reward loyalty for longterm subscriptions.

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Гостелерадио СССР is best service provider. No price hikes, no bundles, no bullshit.

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i had random disconnects sometimes turns out it was because i had outdated modem

so they changed it for me for free and now the internet even runs faster by 300%

 

can t complain about anything but me not caring long time about random dcs

 

oh and companies generally are consumer pro here

the country is small so every ISP and TV provider is in literally every town village and city so if you don t like one changed to another one

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The competition laws are decent in Australia but the infrastructure isn't great, only the recent roll out of the NBN fibre network has helped out any in that regard. All cable TV in Australia is provided by one company, Foxtel, but it's not as popular as I assume cable is in the U.S. in general.

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If you come to NZ, the tv is shit. Don;t even bother with free tv. It is shit, it is shit, IT IS SHIT. There are like 4 channels and the content is absolutely rubbish. Everyone pretty much has Sky to get anything even remotely good...and there is NO SPORT on free tv NZ - AT ALL - . One of the things I am grateful to John Howard for in Australia was the anti-siphoning legislation his government passed to ensure that certain sports were earmarked for free to air tv.

 

I'm with Spark for internet and it's not bad at all I have to say...Me and Cao have unlimited broadband (adsl) for a hungee a month and we don't have any drop outs in service and I don't notice any slow downs...Cao apparently does, but I'm barely home since I started security.

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I pay 84$ for 20mb (Unlimited data cap) + tv + phone.

 

I think that internet is garbage here though i pay way more than the average person here to get better internet because i do like watching stuff like the international on twitch, so yeah.

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I pay 84$ for 20mb (Unlimited data cap) + tv + phone.

 

I think that internet is garbage here though i pay way more than the average person here to get better internet because i do like watching stuff like the international on twitch, so yeah.

Holy shit. 20mb is the starter speed in the Netherlands. Not a single provider tries to sell that to people.

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